News This Week (July 31st)

Read a Brett Easton Ellis interview.

Penguin uses Kite Runner to generate aide for Afghanistan.

See the comic-book art of Jim Steranko.

A scheme is in the works to send books to children.

The top medical graphic novels.

See the rejected covers for The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo.

Robert Kirkman starts a new imprint to help new comers to the comic book industry.

Nicholson Baker’s letter to John Updike.

4 safety deposit boxes containing Kafka’s manuscripts are finally opened, and a judge rules the contents should be made public.

Archipelago Books is awarded $25,000 by Amazon.com to translate a polish book.

Woody Allen makes his own audiobooks.

Anne Rice quits Christianity.

Alan Moore’s new project.

Stan Lee becomes his own character.

The future of The Little Prince includes a 52-part animated series.

Penguin celebrates it’s 75th anniversary.

Stieg Larsson is the first author to reach 1 million ebooks sold on Amazon.

Nick Cave is writing a remake of The Crow.

Some new from ComicCon: Recap, Slide Show, Films

Say goodbye to Artemis Fowl.

Elton John is working on an Animal Farm musical.

Just how old IS the novel?

World War Z will become a film, with Brad Pitt.

Redesigned book covers are sometimes awesome. Sometimes not.

Maurice Sendak gives $1 million to the Jewish Board of Family & Children’s Services.

Alan Moore refuses a deal with DC comics that would have given him the rights to The Watchmen.

How important is a typeface?

There is a Hemingway look-alike contest.

A children’s book about Sarah Palin is postponed indefinitely.

The Great Gatsby video game is maybe not that awesome.

Pride and Prejudice Fight Club (yes, it is a mash-up video).

Neil Gaiman recommends 3 children’s books.

Apple is accused of censorship (again).

The art of filling a bookshelf.

Janina

Janina Larenas is the book buyer for the New Book Department. She is a printmaker and book artist who works with a variety of mediums to create narrative imagery. Her pieces range from stickers and posters to science illustration, embroidery to zines, often merging technical crafts with fine art presentation.