Reckless – Cornelia Funke

For this week’s books in motion we bring you some clips on Cornelia Funke’s new book, Reckless. For fans, like me, of the Inkheart trilogy it’s seemed like ages to wait for a new novel from Cornelia Funke, and I have to admit I was beginning to wonder if she had abandoned Young Adult Fiction for her children’s mini-series. But, HOORAY! This is not the case! Reckless, is finally here! It tells the story of two brother’s and their adventure on the other side of a magic mirror that transports them into world seeped in fairytales and folklore. The story brings back the darkness so often lost in contemporary fairytales that hearkens back to Grimm brothers, sometimes making them even more frightening than the originals. Journey with Jacob and William Reckless as get stuck in a war between Man and Goyl (stone men) in a story about the love between brothers and true romance, and check out the video clips below.


Now Available At Logos!
Reckless
By Cornelia Funke
$19.99

Hunger Games – Suzanne Collins

Last week the last installment of The Hunger Games, Mockingjay, came out and sold over 450,000 copies. For those of you not familiar with the Young Adult series, the games is a distopian series told from the perspective of a 16-year-old girl who is chosen to participate in government enforced game to the death. Beautifully written, suspenseful, and impossible to put down, this series has taken both the Young Adult and the Adult literary world by storm.  Check out these interviews and trailers, and pick up your copies ASAP!





Hunger Games
Paperback
$8.99


Catching Fire
Hardcover
$17.99


Mockingjay
Hardcover
$17.99

Essays – Wallace Shawn

For this week’s Books in Motion we bring you a WNYC interview with Wallace Shawn on his book Essays.  Wallace Shawn is ‘hands down’ one of my favorite writers of all time.  Most well known for his cameo appearances in television and film (inconceivable!), Wallace Shawn is, at heart, a playwright.  His book of essays touches on the work he did with Andre Gregory in My Dinner w

Words of Advice For Young People – William S. Burroughs

And speaking of Burroughs… When I saw this in the list of related videos I just couldn’t pass it up. Spare Ass Annie, a collaboration between Burroughs and Michael Franti (before Spearhead, back when he was doing the Disposable Heroes of Hiphopricy). It is a brilliant album featuring a particularly entertaining version Words of Advice for Young People. Below is a short film experiment by Mario Escobar, where he takes this track and merges it with an old educational film on manners.  As a bonus, we also have a short animated Burroughs film. Enjoy!

This One’s a Classic – Paul M. Davis

For this week’s books in motion we bring you a reading from Paul M. Davis. Paul lives in Chicago, but spent many of his formative years here in Santa Cruz. So many, in fact, that we still like to claim him as our own.

From his site:

Last night I performed a new short story, “This One’s A Classic”, for 2nd Story at Morseland in Rogers Park, with musical accompaniment by Elvis Bride. A hilarious tale of personal failure, about the ill-fated Mule Train Pacific Northwest tour of 2005, which ended in a Wal-Mart parking-lot in Yreka, CA. Due to technical difficulties with the video-camera, this was shot on an iPhone, so it’s not the best-quality video or sound but still comes across quite well. Enjoy!

(Note: the first line of my performance was cut off in this video; so just imagine me yelling “This One’s A Classic!” in boastful old man voice before watching.)



“This One’s a Classic” at 2nd Story – Morseland 4/28/10 from Paul M Davis on Vimeo.

Paul M Davis is a writer of articles, essays and fiction, a musician, and a web tinkerer based in Chicago, IL who is obsessed with the media, class and arcade-style video golf. His writing and other work can be found at www.paulmdavis.com.

How Books Are Made (then and now)

A several weeks ago we linked to the Seattle Pi blog postHow to Make a Book which featured the Encyclopedia Brittanica educational film Making Books from 1947.  We like this film so much, that we’ve decided to feature it on our site as well.  Compare it to the recent film from Alfred A. Knopf / Double Day on the making of Dan Brown’s Lost Symbol.