The Best Small Gift Books


This year there is no need to fill someone’s stocking with toothpaste and gum! No need to fill the extra space in the box with impulse items you picked up in the checkout line! This year, fill the tiny spaces with tiny, thoughtful, artistic books!

Below is our guide to the best small books available at Logos:

Postcard Books:

Beautiful postcard books from James Jean, Mark Ryden, Camilla d’Errico, and Yoshitomo Nara. Each set $9.95, or $12.95 for the oversized Mark Ryden cards.

Small Art Books:

Rift, by James Jean is a small accordion style book with paintings on one side and the pencil drawings on the other, a mini version of his Process Recess art books, for $12.95.

Hundertwasser: Complete Graphic Work 1951-1976 is a pocket sized collection of stunning full color images for $24.95.

Yoshitomo Nara’s Animus is a beautiful, small pop-up book and short story for $25.00.

Ed Rouscha’s Los Angeles by Alex Schwartz is a collection of 4 essays exploring the influence of Los Angeles on pop culture and, therefore, Los Angeles artists. A pocket sized hardcover for $29.95.

Tim Biskup’s The Jackson 500 Volume 3 is a small square volume of color reproductions of his paintings for $14.95.

Small Poetry Volumes:

Pocket sized poetry books from Rainer Maria Rilke, Pablo Neruda, Vladimir Mayakovsky, and Kenneth Rexroth, all between $10 and $11!

Pocket Sized Literary Books:

Everything and Nothing by Jorge Luis Borges $9.95

Shoplifting from American Apparel by Tao lin $13.00

The Novelist’s Lexicon: Writers on Words That Define Their Work $16.95

The Red Notebook: True Stories by Paul Auster $10.95

Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk: A Modest Beastiary by David Sedaris with Illustrations by Ian Falconer $21.99

This Is Water: Some Thoughts, Delivered on a Significant Occasion, about Living a Compassionate Life by David Foster Wallace $14.99

101 Things To Know About Stuff:

The 101 Things I Learned series are short, important lessons intended to help the novice or enthusiast in their field. Nicely bound in hardcover boards, these books are $15.00 (except architecture, which is $12.95)

Penguin Great Ideas Series:

We carry a wide variety of the Penguin Great Ideas, from George Orwell’s essay Why I Write to Darwin’s On Natural Selection. Each book is embossed to look like an old letterpress edition, with beautifully designed covers. $10.00

Oxford’s A Very Short Introduction Series:

Logos is carrying a collection of Oxford’s A Very Short Introduction series on topics such as Jung, Marx, Foucault, Kierkegaard, Nothing, Quantum Theory, Poststructuralism, Postmodernism, Modernism, Modern Art, and many more! At $11.95 each, these small books contain excellent thoughtful insights for the novice (or enthusiast) philosopher.

33 1/3 Essay Series:

The 33 1/3 essay series is one of the best gifts you can give a music lover. Written on specific albums or songs by other musicians, these essays are more or less love songs to some of the most influential music of the past 50 years. $12.95 each

New Fiction from Annalemma

In an effort to promote some awesome things we see happening out there, Logos is starting a new column called “New Fiction” where we share stories from various journals and online magazines around the internet. For our first post we are featuring some new fiction from the Annalemma Magazine, a biannual  literary journal going on it’s third year.

Eternal City  by Matthew Baker

In the same way that a lamb, fed a fat diet of seeds and stems, can grow larger, and thicker, and eventually become another thing entirely—a sheep—power is simply the adult version of something smaller that each of us are born with: cruelty.  What cruelty feeds on, then, is the Other.

Everything I ever needed to know I learned as a child, in the groves of plum and cedar beyond our village, inventing games of chance for the other children in which chance played no part, in which winning or losing depended on my whims alone.  For me, the pleasure in these games was in exposing the Other in each of the children, finding a way to divide them from the rest of the pack, herding them away from the fields and into the caverns, a dark place for my cruelty to feed.  For the mechanic’s son, it was his lips—thick and pale, chapped almost to whiteness from a nervous habit, licking them with the tip of his tongue, a habit which I had pretended to have until he had acquired it as his own… (read more at Annalemma Magazine)